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Friday, December 26, 2003

Final Project: "Online PowerPoint Presentation" 


Resourses:http://classicalarchives.com
Beethoven's talents and brash confidence won the respect of a musical and enlightened aristocracy who treated him with a deference that Beethoven expected and demanded, and that would have shocked both Haydn and Mozart. While he probably could have survived by other means, he received financial support from a number of interested nobleman, but without sacrificing his independence.

Beethoven's output is usually thought of as grouped in early, middle and late periods. The First Symphony (1800) begins the new century on a seventh chord (a mysterious dominant of the subdominant) that quickly challenges classical propriety (although such things had already been explored by C.P.E. Bach, perhaps the true father of the new music). The style of this music already sacrifices the elegance of Mozart's surfaces for power and energy, and Beethoven shows his attraction to the economic use of material favored by Haydn. Beethoven's gruff humor probably owes more to Haydn as well, and by the Second Symphony, the minuet has been replaced with a weightier scherzo which is characteristic of the direction in which Beethoven's symphonic thoughts are moving
Beethoven thus did not become the second Mozart, the darling of court society that his father hoped for. Rather he became an independent force, confident of his own powers, and one whose few lessons with the greats of the previous generation, including Haydn and Mozart, didn't ultimately mean much to him. He settled in Vienna in 1792, and his first public fame came as a piano virtuoso of unprecedented power, with a new and explosive kind of playing that was quite apart from the elegant fluency of Mozart and other virtuosos of the day. His virtuosity is certainly evidenced in his piano sonatas and particularly the five piano concertos, culminating in the Concerto No.5 in Eb (Emperor), which, like the concertos of Mozart, were originally conceived as apt calling cards for a composer/pianist.

Ludwig Van Beethoven is certainly on any short list of the greatest composers. Like all supreme artists, this is not for his prodigious technical gifts alone, but for the depth of human experience and emotion that his music explores and the universality of its message. Beethoven's struggles with his own fate and deafness are embodied in music that fearlessly continued to evolve throughout his life. His continued searching for deeper musical, philosophical and emotional truths brings to mind artists such as Shakespeare and Michelangelo.

Beethoven, the son of a rather dissolute court musician, was born in Bonn, Germany in 1770. It is perhaps his early rebellion against the arbitrary strictness of a father who wanted to exploit his son's talents that formed Beethoven's strong and difficult personality. He was truly a child of the revolutionary spirit that was spreading through Europe, and the first important composer to openly declare himself an artist serving a higher calling than the court or aristocracy.


Resourses:http://beethoven.html
Although Beethoven’s music of the early period is sometimes described as imitative of Mozart and Haydn, much of it is startlingly original, especially the works for piano. His early piano sonatas often have a forceful, bold quality, which is set into relief by the searching inwardness of the slow movements. The Sonata in C minor op. 13 (Pathétique, 1798), the most famous of these sonatas, transfers Haydn’s practice of employing slow introductions to his symphonies to the genre of the sonata. The title refers to a quality of pathos or suffering, which is felt especially in the brooding slow introduction and is twice recalled in later stages of the first movement. The main body of this swift, brilliant movement seems to convey willful resistance to the sense of suffering that dominates the slow introduction.
Beethoven’s music is generally divided into three main creative periods. The first, or early, period extends to about 1802, when the composer made reference to a “new manner” or “new way” in connection with his art. The second, or middle, period extends to about 1812, after the completion of his Seventh and Eighth symphonies. The third, or late, period emerged gradually; Beethoven composed its pivotal work, the Hammerklavier Sonata, in 1818. Beethoven’s late style is especially innovative, and his last five quartets, written between 1824 and 1826, can be regarded as marking the onset of a fourth creative period.


Beethoven’s fame during his lifetime reached its peak in 1814. The enthusiastic response of the public to his music at this time was focused on showy works, such as Wellington’s Victory op. 91 (1813; also known as the Battle Symphony), and a series of patriotic crowd-pleasers, including the cantata The Glorious Moment op. 136 (1814), but his enhanced popularity also made possible the successful revival of Fidelio.

During the last decade of his life Beethoven had almost completely lost his hearing, and he was increasingly socially isolated. He had assumed the guardianship of his nephew Karl after a lengthy legal struggle, and despite Beethoven’s affection for Karl, there was enormous friction between the two. Notwithstanding these difficulties, between 1818 and 1826 Beethoven embarked upon a series of ambitious large-scale compositions, including the Sonata in B-flat major op. 106 (Hammerklavier, 1818), the Missa Solemnis in D major op. 123 (1823), the Thirty-Three Variations on a Waltz by Diabelli in C major op. 120 (1823), the Symphony No. 9 in D minor op. 125 (1824), and his last string quartets. Plagued at times by serious illness, Beethoven nevertheless maintained his sense of humor and often amused himself with jokes and puns. He continued to work at a high level of creativity until he contracted pneumonia in December 1826. He died in Vienna in March 1827.


Around 1810 Beethoven was especially drawn to the poetry and drama of German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whom he met in 1812 through the initiative of Goethe’s young literary friend Bettina Brentano. Bettina’s sister-in-law Antonia Brentano was probably the intended recipient of Beethoven’s famous letter to the “Immortal Beloved.” The letter dates from July 1812 and apparently marks the collapse of Beethoven’s hopes to seek happiness through marriage. Following this disappointment, Beethoven’s output declined significantly, and during 1813 he was generally depressed and unproductive.


The combination of forceful, dramatic power with dreamy introspection in Beethoven’s music made a strong impression in Viennese aristocratic circles and helped win him generous patrons. Yet just as his success seemed assured, he was confronted with the loss of that sense on which he so depended, his hearing. Beethoven expressed his despair over his increasing hearing loss in his moving “Heiligenstadt Testament,” a document written to his brothers in 1802. This impairment gradually put an end to his performing career. However, Beethoven’s compositional achievements did not suffer from his hearing loss but instead gained in richness and power over the years. His artistic growth was reflected in a series of masterpieces, including the Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major op. 55 (the Eroica, completed 1804), Fidelio, and the Symphony No. 5 in C minor op. 67 (1808). These works embody his second period, which is called his heroic style.


Beethoven was born in Bonn. His father’s harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. At the age of 18, after his mother’s death, Beethoven placed himself at the head of the family, taking responsibility for his two younger brothers, both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna, Austria.

In Bonn, Beethoven’s most important composition teacher was German composer Christian Gottlob Neefe, with whom he studied during the 1780s. Neefe used the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach as a cornerstone of instruction, and he later encouraged his student to study with Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, whom Beethoven met briefly in Vienna in 1787. In 1792 Beethoven made another journey to Vienna to study with Austrian composer Joseph Haydn, and he stayed there the rest of his life.


Beethoven, Ludwig van (1770-1827), German composer, considered one of the greatest musicians of all time. Having begun his career as an outstanding improviser at the piano and composer of piano music, Beethoven went on to compose string quartets and other kinds of chamber music, songs, two masses, an opera, and nine symphonies. His Symphony No. 9 in D minor op. 125 (Choral, completed 1824), perhaps the most famous work of classical music in existence, culminates in a choral finale based on the poem “Ode to Joy” by German writer Friedrich von Schiller. Like his opera Fidelio, op. 72 (1805; revised 1806, 1814) and many other works, the Ninth Symphony depicts an initial struggle with adversity and concludes with an uplifting vision of freedom and social harmony.


Monday, December 22, 2003

Ludwig van Beethoven was a German composer who is considered to be one of the greatest musicians of all time father harsh discipline and alcoholism made his childhood and adolescence difficult. After his mother death at the age of 18,he placed himself at the head of the family,taking responsibility for his two younger brothers,both of whom followed him when he later moved to Vienna,Austria.

In Bonn,Beethoven most composition teacher was German composer Christian Gottlob Neefe,with whom studied during the 1780s. Neefe mostly used the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach in his instruction. He later encouraged his student to study with Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,whom Beethoven met brifely in Vienna in 1787.

In 1792 Beethoven made another journey to Vienna to study with Austrian composer Joseph Haydn,and he stayed there the rest of his life. Having begun his career as an outstanding improviser at the pianno and composer of piano music. Beethoven went on to compose string quartets and other kinds of chamber music,songs,two masses,an opera,and nine symphonies.
Perhaps the most famous work of classical music in existence is Beethoven symphony No.9 in D minor op.125. Like his opera Fidelio and many other works,the Ninth Symphony depicts an intial struggle with adversity and concludes with an uplifting vision of freedom and social harmony.

Yet just as his success seemed assured,he was conforented with the loss of that sense which he depended on,his hearing. This impairment gradually put an end to his performing career. However,Beethoven achievements did not suffer from his hearing loss but instead gained in richness and power over the years.His artistic growth was reflected in a series of masterpices,including the Symphony No.5. He continued to work at a high level of creativity until he contracted pneumonia in December 1826. He died in Vienna in Vienna in March,1872.

Saturday, December 20, 2003

In Beethoven biography I will begin my presentation in a classic short introduction talking about his childhood and his love to music since he was 7 years old.
Next I will divided his life into periods(Early period,middle period and late period).
In each period I will mention the most important events in his life.
Then I will specialize his deafness in one supporting point. Moreover I will talk about his death and beyond.
Finally I will end it talking about his work,and here I will divide it into:
1-Symphony(sym 1,sym2,sym3,sym4..to sym no.9)
2-Piano Sonatas(Piano trios and Piano Sonatas).

In my final presentation,im trying to show how there was great people like Beethoven improved there selves in their society.And how they developed their small hobbies into a great work people still remembering it until now..

As to me Beethoven was and still genius composer who tried to make numerous styles of classic music.
Even his deafness could not stop him of composin music.
It was really difficult and fantastic thing how he can creat music notes while he cannot hear it!

Sunday, October 05, 2003

My web log talking about the genious musician Ludwig Van Beethoven. I will talk about his life history and ill mention some of his conerto,symphonies,sonatas and his only opera..

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